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New Perspectives on the Irish Diaspora

New Perspectives on the Irish Diaspora

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Edited by Charles Fanning

$29.50

Paperback (Other formats: E-book)
978-0-8093-2344-9
344 pages, 6 x 9, 41 illustrations
10/30/2000

 

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About the Book

In New Perspectiveson the Irish Diaspora, Charles Fanning incorporates eighteen fresh perspectives on the Irish diaspora over three centuries and around the globe. He enlists scholarly  tools from the disciplines of history, sociology, literary criticism, folklore, and culture studies to present a collection of writings about the Irish diaspora of great variety and depth.

Authors/Editors

Charles Fanning is director of Irish and Irish Immigration Studies at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. His books includeThe Exiles of Erin: Nineteenth-Century Irish-American Fiction, winner of the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation; The Irish Voice in America, winner of the Book Prize for Literary Criticism and Related Fields from the American Conference for Irish Studies; and Finley Peter Dunne and Mr. Dooley: The Chicago Years, winner of the Frederick Jackson Turner Award of the Organization of American Historians. 

Reviews

“Charles Fanning’s credentials in the field of Irish-American literature are matchless. His books, essays, and anthologies of Irish-American fiction have established the canon. . . . It is rare to read an anthology with so comprehensive a range of modes and approaches. By such inclusiveness, Fanning shows the creative, critical, and analytical energies of Irish immigrants, their descendants, and those who study the Irish diaspora. Fanning’s juxtaposition of forms and approaches provides an original pattern in which readers can better understand well-established truths, reexamine old assumptions about Irish émigrés, and entertain new perspectives.”—Shaun O’Connell, author of Imagining Boston: A Literary Landscape and Remarkable, Unspeakable New York: A Literary History